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LUNG CANCER
Resources
The Facts
The Need
Research and Grants

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Though it is the leading cancer death of both men and women in the United States, lung cancer research remains grossly under funded.

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"Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind."

Bertrand Russell

 

RESEARCH AND GRANTS

Though it is the leading cancer death of both men and women in the United States, lung cancer research remains grossly under funded. The August, 2001 Report of the Lung Cancer Progress Review Group to NCI described research funding for lung cancer as “far below the levels that characterize other common malignancies and far out of proportion to its massive public health impact.“ Estimated data from 2008, seven years after the publication indicates little has changed.

Federally funded lung cancer research programs are limited. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) 2008 funding statistics are as follows:

Cancer (Deaths)   N.C.I. Funding per Death
Breast (40,480)   $14,145
Prostate (28,660)   $9,958
Colon (49,960)   $5,478
Pancreas (34,290)   $2,545
Lung (161,840)   $1,529
     
Cancer (New cases)   N.C.I. Funding per New Case
Breast (182,460)   $3,138
Pancreas (37,680)   $2,316
Colon (148,810)   $1,839
Prostate (186,320)   $1,531
Lung (215,020)   $1,151
* based on 2008 estimated incidence and mortality rates

Money for lung cancer research has traditionally come almost exclusively from government sources. Very little money designated for lung cancer research comes from the private sector.

  • In 2006-2007 the American Cancer Society gave $116 million to cancer research. Of that amount, $29 million went toward funding breast cancer research, compared to $7.8 million for lung cancer research. Of the $7.8 million awarded for lung cancer research, most went toward tobacco related issues, and for basic science as well as psychosocial/behavioral issues.
  • As of 2006, there were less than 30 lung cancer specific foundations providing lung cancer research grants, all of which combined did not give more than $5 million dollars in grant money.

Although the government needs to step up to its responsibility of increasing funding for lung cancer research in proportion to its public health impact, it is also necessary to call on the private sector’s generosity in funding lung cancer research. Therefore, the focus of the LCFA will be to open the door to the private sector money supply to support research leading to effective and safe tools for the prediction, early detection and treatment of lung cancer.